Hon. Gen. Scott Harshbarger

S, Harshbarger

Scott Harshbarger is Senior Counsel at Casner & Edwards. For more than a decade, he has developed a practice specializing in providing strategic advice and counsel for corporate investigations and defense, business ethics, compliance and risk management, corporate and not-for-profit governance and government regulation. During his two terms as Massachusetts Attorney General (1991–1999), Scott was elected President of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG), and made Elder Protection his national presidential priority building on his focus on domestic violence and elder abuse, fraud and financial exploitation. Since returning to private practice, Scott has continued to be involved in public policy reform, serving as the head of Governor Romney’s Commission on Corrections Reform (2003-2005), chair of the Blue ribbon Commission on Public Pension Reform, chair of the SJC Taskforce on Hiring and Promotion in Probation and in the Judicial Branch (2010-10110, and a member of the SJC court Management Advisory Board. He has held varying teaching positions in professional responsibility, legal ethics, government, public policy and other law-related subjects at Boston University Law School, Harvard Law School, Northeastern Law School and Northeastern College of Criminal Justice. He also has authored numerous articles on topics in corporate and not-for-profit governance and regulatory strategies. He regularly speaks to state and national business groups, industry associations and legal, business and college audiences. Scott appears regularly in the national media and on New England television as a commentator and news analyst.

Former Attorney General Speaks on Guardianship

By Hon. Gen. Scott Harshbarger / Tuesday, December 4, 2018 / Comments Off on Former Attorney General Speaks on Guardianship

Former Attorney General Speaks on Guardianship By Hon. Scott Harshbarger Former Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts “Guardianship” today means both less and more than it has in the past. Less, because we now understand that decisional support is a spectrum: one size does not fit all, and informal supportive relationships with friends, family…

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